Hold It All

Philosophy/Poetics/Politics

Category: Artists

What I Can Use: Notes on Waldman and Birman’s Civil Disobediences

“Emerson was not a systematic reader, but he had a genius for skimming and a comprehensive system for taking notes…. He read rapidly, looking for what he could use.” p. 67

“He read widely in every field that interested him and he was always pushing into new fields. He read, as he wrote, rapidly. He read actively, as a writer does, looking for what he could use.” p. 99

“Not only must one have the courage to appropriate freely whatever one recognizes as one’s own, one must have the much greater courage to resist and refuse everything that is not one’s own material.” 174

—Robert D. Richardson, Jr., Emerson: The Mind on Fire

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29 January 2016 Notes from Anne Waldman and Lisa Birman, eds., Civil Disobediences: Poetics and Politics in Action

This work is helpful for re-looking at Dear Layla, ideas for classes, stimulus to various practices.

Dear Layla is, literally, specifically, “an essay.”  [What is his genre? —- “Treatise, memoir, travelogue, elegy, novel, dance of the dead… the books seem built of elements of all of these and of none.”  —Hunt, on Sebald, 394]

Dear Layla —“Sentiment at realizing you’ve arrived at the thing that will penetrate through  your own core to other people’s core, and do it through the real world. Describing the real world in such a way as to find the pattern of the real world.” —Ginsberg,  265

Dear Layla —“Writers and intellectuals bear great responsibility for this because if one gives up the right to narrate or intervene, both at home and in other parts of the world, that vacuum will be filled by the discourses of ‘experts.’” —Alcalay, 451

Dear Layla —“Invoke Investigative and Documentary Poetics. Know the score! Know the history!”  —Waldman, 329 Read the rest of this entry »

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Share the Wealth with Carrie Niswonger: Share the Wealth with Carrie Niswonger: Life Through a Lens

Photography is another way to view the world around us as well as using our eyes. While photography  has many uses, numerous people popularly use it as an artistic medium to capture moments, emotions, and memories, all collectively showing a different way to view life. Photography is also one of the very few things that defies impermanence– moments are forever captured in time to show and teach others.

As a sixth grader, I was fascinated by that idea– to capture a past moment. So, I received my very first camera for my 11th birthday. Almost 9 years later, as a sophomore in college, I have yet to put down the camera as well as take a formal photography class. 11 year-old me was determined to teach myself and learn along the way. Despite my status as an amateur-photographer, sharing my photos and showing others how I see the world brings me great joy, although I rarely have a chance to do it. Therefore, I am delighted to talk about one of my passions and share my photos.

Join us!
Sunday 23 July 2017
Potluck dinner begins at 6:00 pm
Carrie will share at 6:45
At the home of Christine Wallach and Carrie Niswonger
5 East Lake Road
Fenton, MO
63026

From Chris: Directions from Google will take you to the mailbox at the end of my gravel road. Follow the gravel. When you see a three car garage (my mother’s house) look to the right for a right turn. Follow that down to the bottom of the hill and you will arrive at my house.

When We Are Artists

“When the artist is alive in any person, whatever her kind of work may be, she becomes an inventive, searching, daring, self-expressive creature.  She becomes interesting to other people. She disturbs, upsets, enlightens, and opens ways for a better understanding. Where those who are not artists are trying to close the book, she opens it and shows there are still more pages possible.”

–Robert Henri, The Art Spirit

The Good News, 3.2.2017

The Good News is…Andrew Wimmer just invested in a Fuji camera, and this means he will he honing his eye-craft, which I am sure will bring joy, insight, and provocation to others.

One day may I be a silent witness to hear creative exchange among Andrew, Cami Kasmerchak, Oliver Clark, and Julie Ann Johnson as to the challenges and breakthroughs of birthing photos and sending them out into the world.

Scan 61

Mev Puleo, Berkeley, CA, 1995

 

Colloquium with Cami

Cami and I are taking turns each month sharing something with each other.  Last month I did a session on Gurus, Teachers, and Mentors, and this weekend she shared the following reflections for our writing and sharing together:

Sunday, October 23rd 2016- Northwest Coffee

Writing Prompt: How has photography been a part of your life?  (3 min.)

Reading of first 4 quotations on photography

Writing on one or all of the photographs you brought along  (20 min.) Read the rest of this entry »

Saturday 15 October: Share the Wealth with Yael Shomroni

I immigrated to the US from Israel and I’m a potter. I will be talking about being an artist in St. Louis, being an immigrant, about leaving Israel because of the Apartheid and my favorite subject…  the necessity of challenging progressive Jews in the US on Palestine.

Join us
Saturday 15 October
Potluck dinner begins at 6:00 p.m.
Yael begins sharing at 6:45
At the home of Fatima Rhodes
4406 A Laclede
Central West End
63108

yael

For K. L.

After his own New York show in 1988, his work dried up. He moved many times and every time he moved he dumped what little work he had produced. But he didn’t stop thinking of himself as an artist. The abiding lesson he took from Duchamp was that being an artist was about living as an artist, rather than producing some product, some work of art for a gallery, or even for oneself.

–Barnaby Martin, Hanging Man: The Arrest of Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei Arrest

An Hour for Ai Weiwei

After meeting with Marty, J’Ann, and Suzanne, I offered to propose something for a gathering of old and new friends Thursday 1 October at Hartford Coffee on Hartford from 4:30-5:30.

I want us to discuss Ai Weiwei! He is at the creative intersection of art, activism, and accountability. He said, I am always trying to find how to get the message through. [In Munich] we custom-made five-thousand backpacks like the ones of these students [who died in Sichuan] to construct a simple sentence [spoken by the] mother of a dead student. It was: “She has been happily living in this world for seven years.”

If you have 12 minutes, check out his Ted Talk.

If you have 15 minutes, read the Weiwei-isms I’m compiled from one of his books, below (sort of his answer to the Quotations of Chairman Mao). Note the ones that grabbed you.

If you have 20 minutes, visit his web site.

If you have 90 minutes, watch the documentary available at Netflix streaming, Never Sorry.

Look forward to being with those able and interested to make it,

Mark

 

Weiwei-isms, by Ai Weiwei, edited by Larry Warsh

Liberty is about our rights to question everything.

My favorite word? It’s “act.” Read the rest of this entry »