The Way It Looked in 1970 (Pessimism of the Intelligence, Optimism of the Will)

by Mark Chmiel

What can we do to affect the events that are to come? First, we must not make the mistake of placing trust in the government. The large upsurge of antiwar sentiment can be an effective device for changing national policy if it is sustained in continuing mass actions across the country. Otherwise the administration can ride out the storm and continue as before to systemically demolish the society of South Vietnam and Laos. It is difficult week after week, month after month, to sustain a high level of protest against the war. American society becomes more polarized and the true, familiar Nixon emerges in the person of Mitchell or Agnew, as the threat of repression becomes more real, it will be hard to maintain the kinds of resistance and protest that the Vietnam catastrophe demands. As the reports of massacres and automated murder becomes routine, the impulse to respond by violence may become more difficult to stifle, despite the realization that this can only have the effect of bringing the mass of the population to “ignore resultant atrocities.” Continued mass actions, patient explanation, principled resistance can be boring, depressing. But those who program the B-52 attacks and the “pacification” exercises are not bored, and as long as they continue in their work, so must we.

–Noam Chomsky, “After Pinkville,”  At War with Asia, 83-84

 

Viet Cong Youth Volunteer La Thi Tam counts bombs dropped by American bombers. This was to enable delayed-fuse bombs to be located and deactivated. 1967

Viet Cong Youth Volunteer La Thi Tam counts bombs dropped by American bombers. This was to enable delayed-fuse bombs to be located and deactivated.

Advertisements